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Thread: Skate Sharpening and hollows etc

  1. #11
    I'm Cultured, Bitch ianmonsta's Avatar




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    i just got a new pair of skates, should i sharpen them out of the box or skate on them first?

  2. #12
    Support the Fans SirJW's Avatar




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    Look at the blade you should be able to tell if they have ever been sharpened. If you bought them online they probably need to be sharpened first.

  3. #13
    beingbobbyorr
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    Quote Originally Posted by imamonsta View Post
    i just got a new pair of skates, should i sharpen them out of the box or skate on them first?
    Skates are NEVER sharp 'out of the box'. They always need to be sharpened, and the pro shop where (and when) you buy them should do it without extra charge.

    More importantly, you need to get them baked at the time of purchase. Having the boots molded to the contours of your feet is critical to having a short break-in time.

    1. Purchase skates
    2. Have them baked and sharpened at time of purchase*
    3. Wait at least 24 hours (I'd wait 48 to be safe)
    4. Then you can go for your first skate

    * purchasing skates via internet means making a separate trip to some local pro shop to have the baking and sharpening done ... probably for some nominal fee, as they aren't making any money on the skate purchase.

  4. #14
    Zero to Tutti Frutti AutomaticBzooty's Avatar




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    I've been experimenting with different depth hollows recently.

    First I tried a 3/8" and found stopping to be a very ginger proposition; but as expected, digging in to the ice felt really secure. In fact, my acceleration seemed to benefit as well...I weigh about 150 lbs without any gear on, so I wonder if I fall into the category of one of those light people who do well with deeper hollows because it allows us to dig in deeper. I felt like my first shove had a lot more power than before.

    Yesterday I switched to a 5/8" and I was sliding all over the ice at first, but gradually I got more and more used to it. The pro shop guy recommended that I unlace my skates by one eye, to give me more control over my edges. This was also a rather tricky thing to navigate, having never done that before. I'm not so sure I like this, though; I feel like I'm having trouble digging in with my inside leg in turns, and the general feeling of sliding all over the ice is unnerving, especially having just come from the 3/8" hollow.

    Here's my question; exactly what is it about a shallower hollow that lends to speed? Is it the gliding of the blade on the ice, or is it something to do with the fact that your skate digs in less on each push than it does with a deeper hollow? Or both?

  5. #15
    beingbobbyorr
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    Quote Originally Posted by AutomaticBzooty View Post
    ... Yesterday I switched to a 5/8" and I was sliding all over the ice at first, but gradually I got more and more used to it. The pro shop guy recommended that I unlace my skates by one eye, to give me more control over my edges. This was also a rather tricky thing to navigate, having never done that before. I'm not so sure I like this, though; I feel like I'm having trouble digging in with my inside leg in turns, and the general feeling of sliding all over the ice is unnerving, especially having just come from the 3/8" hollow. ...
    Another thing I only discovered a year ago to improve my skating was how to deal with my socks. I used to do the following:

    (a) put on regular knee-high socks
    (b) put on these elastic/spandex shin-guard holders
    (c) put on hockey socks
    (d) put skates on
    (e) tuck (b) & (c) into top 1" of skate boot
    (f) lace up skates & tighten
    (g) stuff shin-guard into (b) behind tongue of skate boot (which is then pushed out & down)

    ..... then hockey pants & rest of equipment (NO tape!)

    DUMB! DUMB! DUMB! DUMB! DUMB!


    Now I do the following:

    (a) put on regular knee-high socks
    (b) put on hockey socks
    (c) put skates on
    (d) lace up skates & tighten (hockey socks NOT tucked into top at all)
    (e) pull bottom of hockey socks down over boot top
    (f) tuck the laces (already firmly tightened) under hockey socks
    (g) stuff shin-guard between regular socks and hockey socks with bottom of shin guard now going in front of tongue of skate boot
    (h) wind clear plastic hockey tape (easily tearable kind) from bottom to top: one loop at bottom around top of ankles (now your laces can't accidentally come undone during your game/practice!), continue with 1/2 to 1 loop diagonally around calf to get to one more loop just below the knee

    ..... then hockey pants & rest of equipment

    First, tape secures so much better than those elastic/spandex holders. Why didn't anyone tell me?

    Second (finally addressing AutomaticBzooty's issues), having only the one regular sock layer inside the top of my boot (below / at / and above the ankles) gives me so much better control over my skating that I don't know whether to kick myself for not experimenting sooner or kick the more experienced players for not pointing out my ignorance over the years in various locker rooms.



    Quote Originally Posted by AutomaticBzooty View Post
    ... Here's my question; exactly what is it about a shallower hollow that lends to speed? Is it the gliding of the blade on the ice, or is it something to do with the fact that your skate digs in less on each push than it does with a deeper hollow? Or both?
    The shallow hollow = less surface area of metal blade in contact with the ice.

    Less surface area = less friction = greater speed & less fatigue.
    Last edited by beingbobbyorr; March 5th, 2008 at 01:18 PM.

  6. #16
    All Star Hockey Girl's Avatar




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    I have a question about sharpening and reading this thread actually has me a little confused.

    First my question. I've got about 4 hours on my blades since they were sharpened and I noticed today that my right outside edge is completely gone, there is no sharpness to it at all. Not a fun thing to discover in the midst of a turn. The inside edge isn't much better. My left skate still feels sharp. Is it possible to have one skate sharpening wear out so much quicker than the other or was it a botched sharpening?

    And now, the reason for my confusion. I was at Hockey Giant and the guy there recommended a 3/8" sharpening because of my small size. Now, after reading this thread, it seems that I should've gone for a 1/2" sharpening to compensate for my lack of size and weight on the blade. I don't have a problem generating speed and I'm comfortable turning, so I'm thinking a deeper hollow might be good for me. Is that the correct thinking?

  7. #17
    Muffisher mudfisher's Avatar




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    First my question. I've got about 4 hours on my blades since they were sharpened and I noticed today that my right outside edge is completely gone, there is no sharpness to it at all. Not a fun thing to discover in the midst of a turn. The inside edge isn't much better. My left skate still feels sharp. Is it possible to have one skate sharpening wear out so much quicker than the other or was it a botched sharpening?
    Yes its very possible that you favor one side over the other which causes one blade to dull faster. As you get more experience on your skates this problem should go away.


    And now, the reason for my confusion. I was at Hockey Giant and the guy there recommended a 3/8" sharpening because of my small size. Now, after reading this thread, it seems that I should've gone for a 1/2" sharpening to compensate for my lack of size and weight on the blade. I don't have a problem generating speed and I'm comfortable turning, so I'm thinking a deeper hollow might be good for me. Is that the correct thinking?
    Hallows are all about personal feel. Shallow hollows more speed and easier stopping. Deeper hollows easier turning and little tougher on the stopping. 1/2 is right in the middle.

    If you are still trying to learn how to hockey stop I would try 5/8 inch hollow.

  8. #18
    Zero to Tutti Frutti AutomaticBzooty's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by Hockey Girl View Post
    And now, the reason for my confusion. I was at Hockey Giant and the guy there recommended a 3/8" sharpening because of my small size. Now, after reading this thread, it seems that I should've gone for a 1/2" sharpening to compensate for my lack of size and weight on the blade. I don't have a problem generating speed and I'm comfortable turning, so I'm thinking a deeper hollow might be good for me. Is that the correct thinking?
    Actually, being somewhat light myself (5'9", 153 lbs), I have to say that personally I like the deeper hollows a lot better. I use a 3/8", since I've never had any problems stopping, but have always had more problems with acceleration. The deeper hollow lets me dig deeper into the ice, and get a more solid first push. I recently experimented with both 1/2" and 5/8", and I was sliding all over the place, and wasting a lot of energy by not being able to get a good grip on the ice.

    I say try them both out! I spent three weeks in February with a different depth hollow each week.
    Last edited by AutomaticBzooty; May 11th, 2008 at 10:33 PM.

  9. #19
    pkd88
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    I think BobbyO messed up his wording.

    The sharper or deeper hollow allows for more edging. Tighter turns and quick acceleration.

    The less sharp or shallower hollow allows for speed but, without the edges it will take you longer to get there.

    The heavier you are, the less hollow you need.

    There is a balance and comfort you have to discover yourself. If you only play once a week it doesn't matter much.

  10. #20
    x Straight Edge x HULKING WAR MACHINE's Avatar




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    And goalie skates?

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